Indigenous Wood Speaks Today

Andreas stayed for a week. He comes from Germany and lives in Norway. It was he who, when we had to equip the Open Gate fast for our first season with very little money, bought furniture etc for bargain prices at Alnwick auctions. It was he also who found, dragged and carved the large cross that has ever since graced our prayer room. It is made from a Norwegian railway sleeper that was washed up on the south shore at Holy Island.

Andreas is the most talented entrepreneur I have met. He bought and sold cars that financed him and his wife for a year at the USA Morning Star Prophetic School. He joined an African Christian who became wealthy through Real Estate, launched a missional, prophetic movement of churches that attracted vast numbers, and encouraged his followers to use their talents and time so that they, too, would prosper. To people like me who warn against the dangers of 'The Prosperity Gospel' Andreas gives a challenge: 'Why do you limit God? Take off all the limitations you put upon God'. So now I am examining what limitations I put upon what God wants to do. However, I remain glad that in our Community of Aidan and Hilda vows we state we are willing to be 'poor or rich for God'. And as I gaze at that large cross made from a Norway railway sleeper I think of these words: 'Though he was rich, yet for our sakes he became poor'.

Heather emailed from Queensland: 'On Anzac Day we had a service at St Marks in the afternoon using the prayer rhythms remembrance for war dead. (See Liturgies from Lindisfarne Kevin Mayhew Ltd). It was a communion service led by Jeremy (now our bishop) at which we lit candles for 101 Australians in the first wave of landings at Gallipoli who died that day. It was well attended and appreciated and will probably be a regular AD event now. Next year we will probably remember the Indigenous service people. Also on the agenda will be a service remembering all the nations present at Gallipoli (including the Turks).... I’ve been working on a frontier Wars installation at the Green House which is part of the Indigenous War Memorial. It consists of 8 poles beside the road each painted by an indigenous artist representing local Indigenous culture and places where my ancestors were first settlers. The poles are linked by strands of barbed wire on which are suspended various settler artefacts -an old plough etc. Fences were an important instrument of dispossession.

Now I am with Voyager Andy Hever and his wife Lynn at his Rectory in Beragh, near Omagh, Northern Ireland, at the start of an all-Ireland tour. More next week.

Posted at 18:30pm on 6th May 2017